Quest for the Magic Candle, Part 4

The CRPG Addict has reached 1989, the year The Magic Candle was released, reminding me to post more about the treasures I found while searching for The Magic Candle manual.

My shorts, totally covered in cobwebs, spider webs and dust.

Yeah, when you hear about epic quests, you never imagine how filthy the heroes get.

A series of games laid out on the floor. In order: Planetfall, Fahrenheit 451, A  Bards Tale, Hacker II, Beyond Zork, 50 Mission Cap, <No name>, The Pawn, Breakers, Ultima VI, Autodule, NATO Command, War Of The Lance, Tass Times in Toontown, <Illegible>, The Magic Candle

I found many great treasures alongside The Magic Candle, worth a fortune in gold and old computer parts…

A white game manual, with a very nice looking ink sketch of a dragon on the front

I have no idea what game this is from, but that is one awesome dragon. Sadly it loses a lot of its impact due to the blurriness of the image. I wish more modern games would use art instead of 3d models.

A small, toy toolkit sitting on a road map taken from the game Autoduel

I know Chet didn’t like Autoduel, but man, you can’t beat the loot that came with the game!

The unfolded fake newspaper from Tass Times in Tonetown

Trickster mentioned this on his blog, and I thought he would like to see it.

Well, that is enough looking at the treasures from my quest for today. Until next time, Stay Geeky.

–Canageek

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13 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. I’m not sure if I mentioned it, and you’re probably not interested in doing so, but old games can go for quite a bit on ebay depending on what it is. I sold a complete Ultima I for about 120, and most of what you have seems to be in great condition.

    That is definitely a cool dragon, and I’d be interested in learning what game that came from if you ever find out.

    • I found out, but forgot again; I’ll try and remember to check when I’m home for the July long weekend.

    • The Dragon came form the text adventure, “DragonWorld” by Trillium or Telarium As the company changed names during their operating time.

      • Yes, that is it. I remember reading through the manual to find the name, but forgot it. Was it any good?

        • It was your standard fantasy text adventure. The best of the Telarium games were Amazon and Fahrenheit 451. Still worth having a copy of it though.

          • Well, on the plus side I have one of those. We need to find some text adventure fanatic to play through the lot of them, don’t we?

  2. This is awesome! I love old RPGs and RPG-related items.

    Thanks for posting this.

    • I’ve got the next part written and scheduled for next Monday, I’ll try and write some more parts. I’ve got a few postings worth of images left at this rate, plus the manual I actually went down there looking for.

  3. Your pile of classic game boxes brings a tear to me eye. I also have a pile of boxes like that, although the only game we have in common is Bard’s Tale II – which I got at a yard sale back in the early 90s, for a quarter, I think.

  4. Hey, that is one awesome stash of gaming goodness you found there Canageek! If I were to search through my fathers old stuff I’d be more likely to find boxes called Hot Times in Bonetown or perhaps Phallic Handle, or maybe even Beyond Pork! Those boxes also give me warm nostalgic feelings about my youth, but I don’t think it’s at all related to computers. At least…it wasn’t yet. ;)

    • Heh, well, I did find Leather Goddesses of Phobos.

  5. Hey Canageek, I just realized – that blurry dragon picture was not just from a text adventure game…There is a book of the same name! “Dragonworld”, by Byron Preiss and Michael Reaves. Joseph Zucker is named as the illustrator, and the book was published in 2000. I remember reading it.

  6. Correction – Dragonworld was published in 1979, Amazon must be listing it by the reprint date. But it’s mentioned in Byron’s wikipedia entry. I was sure I’d read it more than 12 years ago!


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